Media

The Bay Citizen divorces NYT to marry CIR

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This Sunday is the last day The Bay Citizen – the nonprofit San Francisco newsroom started two years ago by Warren Hellman, the local philanthropist who died in December – will be producing content for The New York Times, as it has been doing throughout its existence. The question now is what are Bay Area citizens losing and what are we gaining?

The Bay Citizen was taken over by the Berkeley-based Center for Investigative Reporting, creating the country's largest nonprofit news organization, a merger that will be completed next week. Under the direction of veteran local journalists Phil Bronstein, Robert Rosenthal, and Mark Katches, the combined newsrooms won't be covering breaking news or press conferences, focusing instead on investigations and “accountability journalism” delivered under those two brands and CIR's California Watch, in collaboration with newspapers and broadcast outlets around the state (read our previous stories for more details on each entity).

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Bay Area media merger approved, pending okay from AG

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The Center for Investigative Reporting (CIR) and the Bay Citizen today approved a merger that would consolidate the media organizations into a single newsroom, eliminating its breaking news coverage of San Francisco but seeking to generate local news stories from the data-heavy reporting of CIR's California Watch and figure out what's next for the journalism industry.Read more »

Journalists express doubts about nonprofit media merger

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Will the Bay Area's two biggest nonprofit newsrooms -- Bay Citizen and the Center for Investigative Reporting -- merge and what would that mean for local journalism? While we await votes as soon as next week on the first part of that question, I explored the second part in last week's Guardian. Read more »

Bronstein and mergers are not what local journalism needs

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Local, independent, public interest journalism – which is what Warren Hellman sought to create by founding the Bay Citizen in 2009 – could be undermined by a proposed merger between that newsroom and the Center for Investigative Reporting (CIR) under the leadership of former San Francisco Chronicle Editor Phil Bronstein.Read more »

Editor's notes

Mainstream media's got a funny sense of what objectivity means

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tredmond@sfbg.com

When I was working on my college paper, the vice-president for academic affairs, a rather serious man named William Brennan, delivered a lecture on some obscure topic to a group of, I think, economic majors, and somehow, a Wesleyan Argus reporter was there to cover it. The young journalist gave a fair rendition of the event, and the headline an editor wrote was about the most accurate thing I've ever seen in a newspaper. It read:

"Brennan bores small crowd."Read more »

Warren Hellman, the 1 percent exception

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San Francisco lost a piece of its soul when Warren Hellman died last night. In a deeply polarized city, where Occupy’s paradigm of the 99 percent versus the 1 percent resonates more than anywhere, Hellman showed how an extremely wealthy investment banker could champion the interests of all San Franciscans.Read more »

The Chronicle's coverage of Occupy

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I couldn't help but notice that the front page of the San Francisco Chronicle today juxtaposed this lead news photo and article about yesterday's Port of Oakland shutdown with the following headline: "Blacks don't feel drawn to white-led movement."

San Francisco's paper of record was referring to Occupy Oakland, which led several marches to shut down operations at the port Dec. 12 and claimed victory after accomplishing just what protest organizers had set out to do.Read more »

About that "acrimonious fall"

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Catch this. Mayor Ed Lee's mayoral victory had nothing to do with millions of dollars in campaign contributions from private interests, a sophisticated get-out-the vote effort targeting Lee supporters, the advantage of incumbency, some funny business, or a calculated campaign strategy concentrating efforts on absentee ballots. Read more »

Dailies dutifully vomit out the city's misleading portrait of OccupySF

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Both the Examiner and the Chronicle reported this morning that the OccupySF encampment has become a public health hazard, setting the stage for what many believe is an imminent police raid. The newspapers' only source: a notice that the Department of Public Health handed out to protesters, at their camp in Justin Herman Plaza, at 6am today. Read more »